Ohio State alumna working toward Olympic dreams after lone year of club

OSU alumna Katiann Scherer.Credit: Courtesy of Katiann SchererA single year of a club sport is paying dividends for one former Buckeye.Katiann Scherer, a 2014 graduate of Ohio State, is the current goalie for the USA women’s team handball squad. The animal science major played just one year on the club team handball team at OSU, while also volunteering and working at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium and OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine.Her path is an unconventional one, but, perhaps, it is a fitting way to arrive on the national team for a sport that receives very little attention in the U.S.Considered to be “soccer with your hands,” team handball features six court players, along with a goalie. Team handball was first played in the Olympics at the 1936 Berlin Games, but it was not until the 1976 Montreal Games that women’s team handball debuted. The U.S. has never medaled at the Olympics in the sport. Both the men’s and women’s top finishes came at the 1984 Los Angeles Games, where the men placed ninth and women placed fifth.According to Scherer, handball is the “most American sport that Americans don’t know about.”Scherer’s journey to the sport began at OSU’s annual Fall Student Involvement Fair, where she and her sister were looking for a club team sport to play together. Since the sisters each played soccer in high school and enjoyed the physical aspect of the sport, the search landed the pair with the OSU Team Handball club.“I had played (handball) a couple times in middle school,” Scherer said. “But besides that, I really had zero experience or knew what I was doing before joining the club team.”With that being said, Scherer began attending practices for about six months, although she admitted she didn’t know just how much she would enjoy the sport. But as time progressed, the team’s then-coach, Mark Ortega, began to notice the potential in the goalie. “I took a shot to the face during the practice, and (Ortega) noticed that I got right back up and liked my hustle,” Scherer said.Ortega, a former men’s national team handball player, became coach of the club team at OSU in order to “recruit” players to possibly try out for the women’s national team.Ortega told Scherer that she had the skills and abilities to make the squad and recommended that she travel to Auburn, Alabama, for the tryout. Following the advice of her coach, Scherer made the trip south to the facility of the USA Team Handball Residency Program, the location of the tryout.The former Buckeye, filled with nerves and with less than a year of handball under her belt, performed sensationally. USA coach Christian Latulippe became aware of Scherer’s ability, and granted her a spot on the squad.“It’s an amazing feeling to be able to represent the United States,” Scherer said. “The opportunity I get to travel, and meet all of these other girls from different countries, is out of this world.”Members of USA team handball. Credit: Courtesy of Katiann SchererAfter making her way onto the national team roster, it was time to train and attempt to qualify for the 2016 Summer Olympics held in Rio de Janeiro. “I was in Auburn for the past year, and we went to a few different countries to train, and also qualify through the (Pan-American) Games in Toronto this past summer,” Scherer said. Those training sessions and matches included trips to Guadeloupe, Puerto Rico and Cuba, as well as a meeting with the Canadian national team in Auburn. However, the women’s team did not qualify for this year’s Olympics, and will now attempt to work and win its way to a bid to the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.Over this past fall, Scherer made her way to France to try out for professional handball teams in order to stay fit and train during the national team’s offseason. “It’s like baseball here in America,” Scherer said. “They have minor league teams for amateurs, and the goal is to work your way up to the professional level.” Scherer made a team in a small town of Hazebrouck, France. However, complicated visa requirements, combined with her little grasp of the French language, led her to opt to pass on the offer to play there. She is still remaining active in finding another professional team to join, she said. “I’m trying to go to a training camp in Hungary at the end of the summer and hope to make some connections there for other possible teams to play with,” Scherer said.Currently, Scherer is living at home in Canton, where she is working to use her animal science degree by applying for jobs in the field. The Buckeye trains in her spare time, both in Canton and at OSU, in order to stay fit for the upcoming handball season.Beyond that, Scherer is working hard to find ways to implement team handball in high schools on the state and national levels. This is an attempt to have others gain knowledge of and passion for the sport, just like Scherer developed. “After that one year down in Alabama, I realized how much I loved (the sport),” Scherer said. “Now I’ve shaped the rest of my life around handball and what (Team USA) is trying to do.” read more

Football JT Barrett wants one team to believe in him

Ohio State quarterback J.T. Barrett is honored on the field for Senior Day. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorINDIANAPOLIS — For four years, J.T. Barrett was the man. The Ohio State football team followed the quarterback everywhere he went and the city hung on his every word.Now as he prepares to take a shot in the NFL, everything has flipped. A crop of 15 to 20 reporters circled around the podium on which Barrett spoke, but the attention paled in comparison to the media circus three podiums away encapsulating former USC quarterback Sam Darnold, the player who led the team which Barrett beat in his final collegiate game.When asked whether if it felt weird to not be the center of attention, he took a long look over his right shoulder at the throng of journalists surrounding Darnold, then simply said, “Nah, I’m good.”He no longer must worry about the spotlight he could never seem to avoid at Ohio State.Despite setting the all-time Big Ten records for total offensive yards (12,697) and touchdown passes (104), holding 34 school records and becoming the first three-time team captain in program history, Barrett might not have a spot in the NFL. Teams have plenty of questions about his arm strength, pocket presence and ability to play in a professional offensive system.But Barrett said he does not pay much attention to draft experts or their projections. Instead, he is focused on finding a team willing to prove its belief in the quarterback by selecting him in the NFL draft.“I feel like if you’re going in the first round or you’re going in the seventh round, I think at the end of the day, that’s what you want,” Barrett said Friday at the NFL combine. “So you need one opportunity to showcase who you are as a football player and as a person. Like I said, I just need one opportunity, one team to believe in me and go show them who I am.”Given Barrett’s experience as a four-year starter, there should not be many questions about his strengths and weaknesses. Scouts and general managers can watch 44 starts and an Ohio State-record 38 wins.In those victories, Barrett often found success behind center when utilizing his vision and power in the run game, and he hopes to translate that pocket mobility to the NFL.“Strengths are being able to extend the plays, have the ability to run the ball, not just standing in the pocket like a light post,” Barrett said. “I’m going to move around, be able to make throws on the run. Elevate the game of the people around me.”Some have questioned whether he will switch positions at the professional level. Barrett said no team has asked him to play another position, saying “it’s all been about quarterback.”Instead, he has been working at quarterback in Orlando, Florida, at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex to prepare for the combine and the draft. Barrett has worked heavily to increase his footwork and timing.“When you look at great you look at great throws, you first starting off with footwork,” he said. “You talk about somebody’s arm, but at first, you have to have your feet in place to make those throws, so I’m working on that constantly.”Barrett will be the latest in a long line of former Ohio State quarterbacks — including recent  Buckeye signal-callers Cardale Jones, Braxton Miller and Troy Smith — to head to the NFL. He said he talks to Jones every couple days and saw Miller once in Columbus. Barrett said the NFL veterans told him to be himself and to enjoy the process rather than let it stress him out. That becomes key if Barrett slides further than he anticipates.Less stress comes with being a low-round pick. But with that comes a greater doubt.This year, though, Barrett dealt with hordes of skeptics who favored Dwayne Haskins replacing him. He has faced these questions many times before. They don’t bother him.“How much faith do I have in myself? Uh, I have have some confidence,” Barrett said with a smile. “I think, I don’t know, I’m not the type to voice it. I want to showcase it on the field. So with that, that’s what I plan to do. I think I did a good job preparing and trying to be ready for this moment. I have confidence in myself.”Barrett’s physical tools might never match those of the quarterback who he peeked at over his right shoulder, but that confidence and his leadership have a chance to place him on an NFL 53-man roster. read more

Make it a childs play

first_imgThis is the silver jubliee year of NSD’s Sanskar Rangoli.Children across the country will come to the national capital to participate in the event.  They will present folk performing arts from North East and folk theatre from across the country.The week long event will witness various folk and traditional performances like Lav Kusha, Darz-E-Paather, Gosian Pathe, Mahishashur Mardini and  Maach. Each day all the groups invited will give their performances as well as a special performance will be lined up for later part of the evening.First three days will see art and folk performances by children practicing these arts from different regions of the country. Evenings will  feature a mythological tale in like Bali Wadh and Dwapar Lila,  Rass Leela, Yakshagana Dance Drama among others.Around 2 lakh people, mostly children, have witnessed Bal Sangam till date in the last 7 Bal Sangams. Around 85 groups have participated and showcased around 672 performances till date.last_img read more

Interactive art

first_imgOrganised by Think Arts, the 26-day event will take children on a sensorial journey through an interactive art and theatre exhibition.NM Director-General Sanjiv Mittal said, “The exhibition aims to supply back the luxury that Indians a generation ago enjoyed in their younger days. We have scheduled it with the summer vacations for schools upcountry.”Ruchira Das, founder of Think Arts, says, “Elements would enable the participant children to a world of wonder — in all of its senses.” Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’ “We had the outdoors to play in. We touch, smell, feel, hear, use all of our senses as we explore. These experiences fuel our imagination and heightened our sense of perception,” she added.“At Elements, every action of the child changes the experience for those who follow, creating an ever-evolving space”, reveals Das, who has conceptualised the show.The show will have a room of cupboards and drawers featuring a drawer of tastes, smell, sounds, miniatures among others. “The only way to get to the next room (labyrinth) is by entering a cupboard. The labyrinth has a jigsaw puzzle inspired by a miniature from the gallery at the National Museum,”added Das. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThere is also an art room that invites children to engage in building a sculpture using cardboard boxes, scraps of cloth, paper and found objects. With every interaction, the sculpture takes a new form.Another feature is the textured path, along which the children walk on sand, pebbles, foam and sawdust among others. There is also a music room which has easy-to-play instruments that will help the child explore the sounds of different musical sounds made from elements like seeds, metal, wood and bamboo. Many of these instruments are inspired from those in the music gallery at the National Museum.“The team behind Elements comprises several artistes and organisations who basically believe that children are “thinking, feeling beings who are capable of as much, if not more depth, and understanding as an adult”, says Anurupa Roy, from Katkatha Puppet Arts Trust. She along with Shravan Heggudu and S Raghuvendra, are the designers of the exhibition and co-creators of the artworks.The team also includes professional musician Rajat Mallick and Prarthana Hazra, a recent post-graduate from Kala Bhavan, Santiniketan.When: June 10 – July 5Where: National Museumlast_img read more

Zitar inventor Niladri Kumar forays into EDM

first_imgHe’s widely heralded as the inventor of the ‘zitar’ — a combination of sitar and guitar — and stands among one of the leading exponents of Indian classical music. But now Niladri Kumar, who is ‘very intrigued’ with electronic dance music (EDM), is cutting out an EP based on the popular genre.Niladri, whose new single Head to the heart, which also features Bollywood singer and guitarist Rashid Ali, was unveiled earlier this month, says he is working on two different albums. And one of these would mark his foray into the uncharted musical territory of EDM.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“There are a couple of albums under the pipeline. There are two different albums. One album is deeply rooted in the Indian classical tradition, but it will be on the zitar. It is basically all about the hardcore compositions which we have in Indian classical music, but it will be rendered in a way never done before,” Niladri said over phone from Mumbai. “The second album I am trying to do will be based on EDM. I am very intrigued with EDM and how young people connect to the EDM grooves and music. So I always wanted to do something on those lines. Maybe I’ll release an EP containing around five tracks this year,” he added.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixEven as Indian classical musicians have often worked with fusion overtones, a sitar player working on an EDM-based album is something quite unheard of. About this unconventional musical experiment, Niladri said: “The fusion space is a little blurred. A lot of things come into the fusion space and it is not clearly demarcated. The EDM space is somehow slightly more demarcated than fusion now. I want to work with that space and add to the melodic element in the EDM genre.”  Besides, he feels “you have to try and give the fans a new story, a new thought”.However, Niladri’s ‘ulterior motive’ behind doing this album is to “get to people who connect to the EDM space and are totally unaware of the huge melodic content that our Indian classical instruments hold and how well it can enhance the EDM space”.Niladri, who was first exposed to EDM in Britain, says although he is not very well-versed with Indian EDM producers, he thinks “there is good potential with what’s happening in here”.“When I heard the young kids going for it here, I thought it’s maybe a great idea to use that genre and try and portray your melody in there and give them a feel of the sitar, zitar and the whole Indian space, but not too much,” he added.As far as traditional Indian classical music is concerned, Niladri believes that “Indian classical music is something which has stood the test of centuries, amid the invasion of genres and sounds”.“There are more sitar, tabla and sarod players than any other time in history. That proportion had not increased in terms of the audience listening to it. It’s about the depth in it. There’s a big science involved it,” he said. “People should stop asking about the future of Indian classical music. The question should be asked, what is the future of EDM and fusion music,” added the musician, who will launch his new brand ‘STAY UP Rooted’, and will perform for a cause at a concert in Mumbai on October 30.last_img read more

Game On

first_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Vital Stats: Lanny Morton, 37, and Deena Morton, 38, of Sportscloseouts.comCompany: A sporting goods retailer in Phoenix2006 Projected Sales: $4 millioneBay User ID: ArizonaswedeBottom of the Ninth: Lanny Morton knows what it means to get down to the wire. He was broke in July 2002 when his then girlfriend, Deena, suggested he parlay his love for sporting goods into cash by selling sports equipment online. “I bought 20 bats for $40 each. I sold them on eBay and made $500 [profit] in a week,” recalls Lanny. “My brain kicked in and said, ‘If you can turn product that fast, you could really build wealth quickly.'” Rookie Season: “I didn’t think of it as a business at first,” says Lanny. “The idea wasn’t to turn it into a big company.” But after six months of stellar sales, the pair developed www.sportscloseouts.com.Nothing But Net: Features like Buy It Now helped the Mortons turn over product quickly. The challenge was keeping up with customer demand and becoming more efficient at one point, for example the pair had so many customers they had to stop writing shipping labels by hand and find faster ways to create their listings. Salary Cap: Growing so quickly provided a few scares, however. “We were growing to a level of volume that we didn’t have cash reserves for,” says Lanny. But the pair got better at managing their inventory levels and structuring their listings to maximize profits. Today, they have seven employees.The Crowd Goes Wild: The biggest reward for these sports-minded entrepreneurs is the jubilant response from customers. Says Lanny, “I love it when we sell somebody a bat and they e-mail us [saying], ‘Oh my gosh! My kid hit a home run! We love that stuff.” Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 2 min readcenter_img October 31, 2006 Register Now »last_img read more

Legislation combating probate fraud gains committee approval

first_img26Sep Legislation combating probate fraud gains committee approval Categories: Runestad News Reps. Runestad, Ellison work with AG’s office, Oakland County officials to protect heirs from corrupt public administratorsState Rep. Jim Ellison, left, and State Rep Jim Runestad speak in support of their legislation before the House Judiciary Committee.The House Judiciary Committee today approved legislation introduced by state Reps. Jim Runestad and Jim Ellison to combat probate fraud by requiring more safeguards for heirs of an estate.The bipartisan legislation was developed with input from the Attorney General’s Office after the controversial practices of some county public administrators in southeast Michigan were brought to light. The Attorney General’s Office appoints county public administrators, who serve as representatives for estates in which a deceased person has no known heirs.“This past year we became aware of a situation in Macomb and Oakland whereby heirs were losing rights to property through a fraud scheme,” said Runestad, R-White Lake, who chairs the Judiciary Committee. “I wasn’t going to sit back and allow corrupt public administrators to use their positions to take advantage of residents, so I immediately started working on a remedy to protect families and assets and ensure property is passed down to the rightful heirs by closing loopholes in current statute.”The issue brought Runestad and Ellison together with State Public Administrator Michael Moody, Attorney General Bill Schuette, Oakland County Treasurer Andy Meisner and Oakland County Clerk Lisa Brown to develop the legislation.Current law allows county public administrators to be appointed to represent an estate if another personal representative is not identified within 42 days. Runestad’s legislation, House Bill 4821, extends the timeframe to 91 days and requires a formal proceeding for a county public administrator to be appointed. Current law allows this to take place through an informal procedure.HB 4822, introduced by Ellison, establishes a line of communication between county treasurers and public administrators to verify that occupants of a home and heirs are properly notified of proceedings in the event of a tax foreclosure. If a property is sold, the bills prevent real estate or asset recovery fees from exceeding 10 percent of the net proceeds.“We want to make sure residents are protected when they are grieving the loss of a loved one and every reasonable measure is taken to find rightful heirs before estates are opened in probate,” said Ellison, D-Royal Oak. “I’m very troubled that rightful heirs have had their relatives’ homes sold out from under them and these estates are being charged such excessive fees. These reforms will make sure the heirs’ interests are protected.”Another reform requires public administrators seeking appointment as personal representatives to give notice to heirs and describe their search for heirs, which must now include an electronic searching service.“These bills will strengthen the notice requirements, protect against excessive realtor fees and thereby protect heirs and their inheritance,” Moody said.House Bills 4821-22 advance to the full House for consideration.###last_img read more

Satellite operator SES as launched a new satellite

first_imgSatellite operator SES as launched a new satellite data network, SES Plus, based on its partnership with Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellite operator O3b Networks.The system will combine SES’s geostationary satellites with their wide-beam coverage and upcoming high-throughput capability with O3b’s MEO craft to offer a range of options for data markets.SES’s first Plus product, Enterprise+ Broadband, was launched across five markets in Africa in November. Offering up to 1Gbps of connectivity, it is described by SES as a competitively priced flexible connectivity platform that has a plug and play offering, with pay-as-you-go options.“SES is a leading video satellite operator, but our expertise goes beyond providing services to video customers. Our new data network, SES Plus, highlights the strengths of SES as a data satellite operator. We go beyond building a new ground infrastructure and new satellite architecture of GEO, MEO and HTS beams, to deepening collaboration with our customers to design customised and differentiated products that will enable them to excel in their markets,” said Ferdinand Kayser, Chief Commercial Officer at SES. “The first Plus product is already out in the market, and already we are hearing positive feedback about how this high-speed broadband platform is essential to the countries in which we are operating. That aside, our teams are working around the clock to develop more much-needed customised products to deliver more connectivity.”last_img read more

Satellite operator SES has completed the acquisiti

first_imgSatellite operator SES has completed the acquisition of 100% of O3b Networks.SES said it will fully consolidate the broadband satellite company in its accounts from now on.SES agreed in July to pay US$730 million to increase its stake in O3b Networks from 49.1% to 100%. The transaction sees SES consolidate US$1.2 billion of additional debt.According to SES, O3b will expand its global reach and will build the foundations for sustainable growth. The company operates a fleet of medium Earth orbit satellites designed to deliver broadband connectivity via Ka-band capacity.last_img read more

Subscription videoondemand is driving growth in

first_imgSubscription video-on-demand is driving growth in the European pay on-demand market, accounting for two thirds of total 2016 pay on-demand service revenue in 2016 going to SVOD players, against only 11% five years earlier, according to a report by the European Audiovisual Observatory.The report found that the SVOD market was still relatively small in relation to the pay TV market, accounting for 18% of all pay subscriptions in 2016, up from 1% five years earlier, and accounting for 6.8% of revenues, up from 0.2%.Despite this relatively low base, SVOD is growing fast. SVOD services were taken by 38.7 million subscribers in the EU at the end of 2016, and by 43.5 million in Europe including non-EU countries. This represents an annual growth rate of 55.5% in the EU between 2011-16 and an annual growth rate of 54.2% for Europe as a whole.Some 17% of EU households took SVOD services in 2016, with Scandinavia accounting for four of the top five countries in terms of penetration.SVOD revenues increased by 128% a year between 2011-16 in the EU countries. The top five countries by SVOD revenue were the UK, Germany, Sweden, Denmark and Norway, which together accounted together for 69% of total SVOD revenue in Europe.A total of 197 SVOD services were active in Europe by the end of December 2016. Netflix held an estimated 47% share of OTT SVOD subscriptions, with Amazon holding a 20% share.last_img read more