Electronic Platform Being Developed to Facilitate Investments

first_img Mr. Shaw said the NBP, being developed on a phased basis, will be the central point through which all investments are routed, providing access to all relevant stakeholders. This will serve to improve transparency and government cohesions. The Government has started development of two complementary electronic platforms that will enable increased efficiency in the investment and exporting sectors.The platforms are the National Business Portal (NBP) and the National Trade Portal.This was announced by Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, during his address at the opening ceremony for the Jamaica Investment Forum (JIF), hosted at the Iberostar Hotels and Resorts in Montego Bay, St. James, on Tuesday (June 12).Mr. Shaw said the NBP, being developed on a phased basis, will be the central point through which all investments are routed, providing access to all relevant stakeholders. This will serve to improve transparency and government cohesions.“Ultimately, the NBP will seek to better streamline business approvals and will represent one key output of the National Investment Policy,” he said.The National Trade Portal, meanwhile, is aimed at fast-tracking information sharing, facilitating online application submissions; and enabling back-office interface among the Government’s Border Regulatory Agencies.The trade portal was approved by Cabinet in the 2017/18 fiscal year under the overarching Trade Facilitation Initiative.Mr. Shaw said both projects are funded through the Foundations for Competitiveness and Growth Project of the World Bank.“As a country, we have sought to build a strong and robust landscape in which business can thrive, recognising that comprehensive and supportive business facilitation frameworks are essential for investments and business development,” the Minister explained. Story Highlights The Government has started development of two complementary electronic platforms that will enable increased efficiency in the investment and exporting sectors. This was announced by Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, during his address at the opening ceremony for the Jamaica Investment Forum (JIF), hosted at the Iberostar Hotels and Resorts in Montego Bay, St. James, on Tuesday (June 12).last_img read more

Lack of support holds Indigenous prisoners back

first_imgTodd Lamirande APTN News Parole officers gave Parliamentarians a dose of reality on Indigenous incarceration Tuesday.Zef Ordman said he rarely recommends Indigenous prisoners for early release because they don’t have the employment, training or housing to help ease their transition into the outside world.“The white, middle-class, kid who’s got parents on the outside, and he’s 19 or 20, he’s got employment, he’s got education, he’s got housing,” Ordman told the House Committee of Public Safety and National Security.“The Aboriginal kid doesn’t have any of that.”Ordman said that won’t change unless Canada invests in Aboriginal-centred programs in health, education, employment and housing.Committee members heard release can be denied for something as simple as not having proper identification, because Indigenous offenders often come to prison without health cards or driver’s licences.“We had a job set up for (one inmate),” said Aura Andrews. “He couldn’t get it because he didn’t have his birth certificate or his (social insurance) card and he ended up failing.”Andrews suggested the department of Indigenous Affairs and its provincial counterparts visit prisons to hold identification clinics before offenders are released.The list of problems parole officers face is extensive, according to Andrews and Ordman.Everything from backlogs of individuals approved for transfer to being swamped with paperwork.“We need to be freed up to do our jobs, which is interacting with offenders,” Andrews said. “That is our job. So right now we’re so bogged down in paperwork and compliance issues that we can’t do our job.”“It’s sort of organized mayhem,” added Ordman. “You’re managing 30-plus offenders, right? And you’re sort of the central person, as a parole officer, you’re the central person.”tlamirande@aptn.calast_img read more

Myanmar harvests abandoned Rohingya fields

first_imgRohingya refugees cross a bamboo bridge as they arrive at a port after crossing from Myanmar, in Teknaf, Bangladesh, 25 October, 2017.Myanmar’s government began harvesting rice from farmland abandoned by Rohingya in northern Rakhine on Saturday, officials said, a move likely to raise concerns about the prospect of return for more than half a million refugees who have fled communal violence in the area.The border region has been emptied of most of its Muslim residents since late August, when Myanmar’s military launched a crackdown on Rohingya rebels that the UN has described as “textbook” ethnic cleansing.Hundreds of villages have been burned to the ground, with more than 600,000 Rohingya — a stateless group in mainly Buddhist Myanmar — fleeing across the border for sanctuary in Bangladesh.Under intense global pressure, Myanmar has agreed to repatriate “scrutinised” refugees who can prove their residence in Rakhine.But details of the plan remain sketchy, seeding concern about who will be allowed back, what they will return to and how they will live in a region where anti-Rohingya hatred remains sky-high.On Saturday the government began harvesting 71,000 acres of rice paddy in Maungdaw — the Rohingya-majority area hit hardest by the violence — according to state media and a local official.”We started harvesting today in Myo Thu Gyi village tract,” Thein Wai, the head of Maungdaw’s Agricultural Department, told AFP.”We are going to harvest some paddy fields of Bengalis who fled to Bangladesh,” he said, using a pejorative term for the Rohingya commonly used by officials and the Buddhist public.The official said he did not know what government would do with the rice or its proceeds.Workers were bused in from other parts of the country to assist with the harvest, according to the state-run Global New Light of Myanmar.- ‘Deeply disturbed’ -Rights groups blasted the government’s harvest as part of a systematic effort to expunge the Rohingya from Rakhine.”Government officials leading the harvest are clearly more concerned about these fields of abandoned rice than they ever were about the Rohingya people who sowed it,” said Human Rights Watch’s Phil Robertson.”This all reinforces a singular, local level Rakhine message to the Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh that what’s yours is now mine, and you’re not welcome back.”Fortify Rights said the harvest was an “outrageous” move by authorities who have a long history of land grabs, particularly in ethnic minority frontiers.Myanmar has denied charges of ethnic cleansing and defended its military campaign as a counter offensive targeting Rohingya militants who attacked police posts in late August, killing at least a dozen.But media, rights groups and the UN have documented consistent accounts from Rohingya refugees of atrocities at the hands of Myanmar security officers, who are accused of killing civilians, raping women and torching homes in the wake of the rebel raids.On Friday UN rights experts said they were “deeply disturbed” after speaking to refugees in Bangladesh.The accounts they heard “point to a consistent, methodical pattern of actions resulting in gross human rights violations affecting hundreds of thousands of people,” said Marzuki Darusman, who chairs the fact-finding mission.Myanmar’s civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi — who has no control over the powerful army — recently created a committee to oversee resettlement in Rakhine, where tens of thousands of other minority groups were also internally displaced by the violence.The construction of homes for minorities such as the Mro has begun, according to state media, while Suu Kyi’s government has enticed business tycoons to donate to the rebuilding effort.But fear abounds that the rehabilitation will sideline the Rohingya — a group that has suffered under decades of state-backed discrimination and rising Islamophobia.Myanmar refuses to recognise the Rohingya as a distinct minority, rendering the 1.1-million strong group stateless.The army has spread the view that they are foreign “Bengalis” from Bangladesh, despite many having lived in Myanmar for generations.last_img read more

Rick Perry For Homeland Security Secretary And Beyoncé Buying The Rockets The

first_imgA lot can happen in a week. Some of it good. Some of it bad. Some of it downright ugly. When faced with intriguing developments in the week’s news, we turn to our rotating panel of “non-experts” to parse The Good, The Bad and The Ugly of it all.This week, our panel weighs in on the possibility of Rick Perry becoming the next Secretary of Homeland Security, Lt. Governor Dan Patrick saying he wants better communication with the Texas House, and rumors that Houston’s own pop icon Beyoncé is interested in investing in the Houston Rockets. Our panel of non-experts this week includes:Freelance writer Kyrie O’ ConnorWayne Ashley, academic advisor, digital media strategist and editor of TexasLeftist.com Happy Houston Public Media retiree Paul Pendergraft Sharelast_img read more

MIT group shows unseen motion captured in video

first_img © 2013 Phys.org More information: people.csail.mit.edu/mrub/papers/vidmag.pdfweb.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/cs … visible-changes.html Citation: MIT group shows unseen motion captured in video (2013, March 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-mit-group-unseen-motion-captured.html Explore further The process is called Eulerian Video Magnification. “Our method, which we call Eulerian Video Magnification, takes a standard video sequence as input, and applies spatial decomposition, followed by temporal filtering to the frames. The resulting signal is then amplified to reveal hidden information,” they wrote. They noted that their technique can run in realtime to show phenomena occurring at the temporal frequencies selected by the user.”We are inspired by the Eulerian perspective,” according to the scientists, “where properties of a voxel of fluid, such as pressure and velocity, evolve over time, in a spatially multiscale manner.” In their approach to motion magnification, they said they do not explicitly estimate motion but rather exaggerate motion by amplifying temporal color changes at fixed positions. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org) —A baby lies in the crib looking motionless, a typical situation causing worry to new parents, wondering if the baby is still breathing. A video run through an algorithm designed for amplification shows the baby is indeed breathing with movements that were invisible to the naked eye. It’s that special algorithm at the heart of interest in the work of a group of scientists at MIT who work on a project called motion magnification. They have said that “Our goal is to reveal temporal variations in videos that are difficult or impossible to see with the naked eye.” Their process breaks apart the visual elements of every frame of a video, reconstructed with an algorithm tool that can amplify aspects of the video. This is not the first time their advances have been publicized. The program was presented last year at the annual computer graphics conference, Siggraph. What is new is that the team has revamped the work and they posted code online for people interested in exploring such renderings of motion that otherwise would not be detected by the naked eye. “Our team is still actively working on this direction, so people can expect more to come,” said a team member. “We hope that it will motivate people to look deeper into this type of processing and different applications it can support.” Researchers amplify variations in video, making the invisible visible The team from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory are working on the program to analyze videos to pick up movements. The program was first developed essentially to monitor neonatal babies. They believe their algorithm can be applied to other scenarios to reveal changes imperceptible to the naked eye as well, as in hospital monitoring of patients. You can see a person’s face flushing as the blood pumps from his heart. You can read a baby’s pulse. A spatial pattern of when the blood goes and where is seen; scientists could look to see where the blood flows on the body as well as on the face. “There is a big world of small motions out there,” said a team member. Overview of the Eulerian video magnification framework. Credit: Hao-Yu Wu et al.last_img read more